Keep it simple!

To be successful at sea we must keep things simple.

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To be successful at sea we must keep things simple. – R.D. (PETE) CULLER

Shipyards are building bigger and bigger boats and equipment are getting more and more sophisticated and that’s great for comfortable cruising, but everything is becoming really expensive and complicated.

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Although it’s nice to have electric pumps, hydraulic swimming platforms, push-button sail adjustment, electronics and cool gadgets, we must accept the fact that all these systems eventually stop working (usually at the worst possible moment). If you don’t have them on board, they won’t brake and you’ll be able to enjoy sailing, instead of fixing things. Nobody likes gadgets more than me, but I like simplicity on the boat better…. So, my philosophy is: KEEP IT SIMPLE!

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1st Offshore Sailing

Poreč – Dubrovnik – Zadar… 500 miles…

The time has come to put HIR3 and ourselves to the first real test. We have finally sailed offshore 300 miles non-stop from Poreč to Dubrovnik and then another 200 miles to Zadar.

20170314_171446I have been working on the HIR for a week on dry berth and then another week in the marina before she was ready to set sail.17862856_10154555644490897_228176098241521304_nMy crew came to Poreč, we went shopping and had a few drinks before going to sleep. We sailed out around 7am with a light breeze and rain, but eventually the rain stopped, the breeze freshened and during the night we had strong bora (about 30 knots). We sailed with double reefed main and jib without any major problems except that it was really cold… We had moderate wind the next day and ideal night sailing afterwards. It took us 58 hours sailing to get to a new marina in Slano. We celebrated with a special Captain Morgan Black Spiced Rum;)image2We broke the table in the salon and a few wooden pieces in the interior, but other than that, the boat behaved great and we enjoyed the ride.image44Good boat, good crew, good times:)…

Join us! Set sail on board HIR3 in one of our next adventures… sasa.fegic@gmail.com

18 – 25.5. One-Way Sailing: Poreč – Split

25 – 28.5. Komiška regatta: Split – Komiža – Split

28.5. – 3.6. One-Way Sailing: Split – Zadar

3 – 7.6. One-Way Sailing: Zadar – Rijeka

10.6. Fiumanka: Rijeka

11 – 14.6. One-Way Sailing: Rijeka – Zadar

14 – 18.6. Long Weekend: Zadar – Kornati – Zadar

18 – 21.6. One-Way Sailing: Zadar – Split

21 – 25.6. Long weekend: Split – Vis

25.6. – 2.7. One-Way Sailing: Split – Poreč

Everyone is invited to join me… In case you decide to be part of this fantastic project full of awesome sailing, easy life, good parties, great food and excellent company, you will need to accept some terms and conditions:

1. We kindly ask for a small donation for the project and sailing expenses are shared by the crew,

2. HIR 3 is a great boat, but she is an old lady that has her own will and sometimes we will need to accommodate her so she is happy as we are:)

3. There are maximum of 5 spaces on the boat so in the case of a big request, the choice of crew will be left on the captain (big boobs have the priority;)

4. We will all participate with the duties on board in relation with your capabilities, so if you do not now how to sail, do not worry, there is always some toilet to clean:)

5. It is obligatory for everyone to have a good time!

Murphy was a sailor!

Edward A. Murphy must have been a sailor… Only a person who owns a boat could have come up with that. Who else could have written these laws!? :)…

 

Edward A. Murphy must have been a sailor…

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Edward Aloysius Murphy Jr. (January 11, 1918 – July 17, 1990) was an American aerospace engineer who worked on safety-critical systems.  If anything can go wrong, it will.

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Only a person who owns a boat could have come up with that. Who else could have written these laws!? :)…

  • If anything can go wrong, it will.
  • If there is a possibility of several things going wrong, the one that will cause the most damage will be the one to go wrong.
  • If anything just cannot go wrong, it will anyway.
  • Smile . . . tomorrow will be worse.
  • Left to themselves, things tend to go from bad to worse.
  • If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something.
  • Everything takes longer than you think.
  • Every solution breeds new problems.
  • A falling object will always land where it can do the most damage.

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Only a boat owner can truly relate to his laws… because unfortunately, they are all true! Now, after more than two years of working on a refit of HIR 3, I can really relate to all of them… but all it takes is sailing in a favorable breeze on a sunny day and it’s all worth it!

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She

In English and many other languages, a ship is called a ’SHE’, but even in countries where this is not the case, boats usually carry women’s names… She (a boat) needs constant care and attention and in return, occasionally you can experience great pleasures with her:)

In English and many other languages, a ship is called a ’SHE’, but even in countries where this is not the case, boats usually carry women’s names… She (a boat) needs constant care and attention and in return, occasionally you can experience great pleasures with her:)

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One prosaic explanation is that the gender of the Latin word for “ship” — Navis — is feminine. But people generally agree on the more romantic notion of the ‘ship as a she’ phenomenon: that it stems from the tradition of boat-owners, typically and historically male, naming their vessels after significant women in their lives — wives, sweethearts, mothers. Similarly, and more broadly, ships were once dedicated to goddesses, and later also to mortal women of national or historic significance, thereby bestowing a benevolent feminine spirit on the vessels that would carry seafarers across treacherous oceans. Figureheads on the prows of ships were often depictions of such female namesakes, denoting the name of the ship for a largely illiterate maritime population. (Source: Glossophilia)

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It is often asked why a ship is called a “she”.
The answer is simple:
there is usually a gang of men about her;
it takes an experienced man to handle her correctly, and a lot of paint to keep her look good;
and without a man at the helm, she is absolutely uncontrollable.
She shows her topsides, hiders her bottom and, when coming into port, always heads for the buoys. it is not the initial expense that breaks you, it is the upkeep.

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Yacht design, as carried on at present, is rather like making love to a woman. The approach is completely empirical. At the end, the male, even though he might be successful, usually had no idea of just how and why he had succeeded. – PROF. E.J.RICHARDS

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A ship is always referred to as “she” because it costs so much to keep her in paint and powder. – ADM. CHESTER NIMITZ

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Boats, like whiskey, are all good. – R.D.(PETE) CULLER

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The fact that one refers to a boat as “she” shows that since time began men have loved their boats. – FRANCIS KINNEY

Gone Sailing… Finally!

On our first sailing trip from Kraljevica to Kornati and back to Poreč, we covered about 350 miles… and our adventure is only beginning! If you would like to join us, please contact me…

HIR has been in Kraljevica Shipyard on dry berth for almost three months now… I am a patient man, but even I became nervous and was thinking if I would ever set sail…. but then, finally… After we’ve put new antifouling, engine was fixed, mast step and all shrouds and lifelines were replaced, we painted the mast, put the new windex on top, roll system was serviced, new halyards were in place and mast was stepped and trimmed properly… we were ready to sail away:)!

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There is still a lot of work to be done, but housing sails and first sailing on board HIR 3 after more than two years of refit deserved a proper champagne and whiskey that I opened after I’ve put a coin under the mast…

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Gone sailing… finally! What a great feeling! 🙂

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On our first sailing trip from Kraljevica to Kornati and back to Poreč, we covered about 350 miles… and our adventure is only beginning! If you would like to join us, please just fill out this form: http://goo.gl/forms/CTH1fivtGpAG2pPt1

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Something’s missing…

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We have been working on the boat for quite some time now, but there is still a lot of expensive equipment that we have to install. Friends and colleagues have been halping me and donating useful things which helped us a lot… THANK YOU ALL!

I decided to make an equipment list in google docs that will be updated constantly as we progress, so if by any chance, you have something useful for us… we would really appreciate it;)

Equipment list: LINK

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